• Media Inquiries

    Contact: press@impactjustice.org

  • Impact Justice in the News

    Cruel and Unusual: The Case Against Registering Kids as Sex Offenders

    American Bar Association's Criminal Justice magazine's Summer 2017 edition features an article by CYRR Director and Impact Justice Vice President Nicole Pittman, as well as Juvenile Law Center's Senior Supervising Attorney, Riya Saha Shah, about the harm of placing youth on the sex offender registry and the efforts being made to reform these laws.

    Making it Right Again

    By bringing victims and perpetrators together, she’s helping repair harm and turn lives around. Meet restorative justice expert sujatha baliga.

    sujatha baliga to give keynote presentation at Marquette Law School’s Restorative Justice Conference

    Sujatha Baliga will give a keynote presentation at the 2016 Restorative Justice Conference hosted by Marquette Law School, Nov. 10-11 in Eckstein Hall, 1215 W. Michigan St. The topic of this year’s conference is “Restorative Justice and Domestic Violence: Exploring Effective Pathways to Healing.” The conference is designed to bring together survivors, community members, lawyers, teachers, social workers, students and others to learn about domestic violence and pathways to healing. It will explore the usage of restorative processes such as victim-offender dialogue, surrogate dialogues, and circle processes to promote accountability and healing in domestic violence cases.

    Nicole Pittman at University of South Dakota Law School Juvenile Justice Symposium

    The South Dakota Law Review and the USD School of Law presented a symposium to discuss issues associated with juveniles in the criminal justice system in the United States where CYRR Director and Impact Justice Vice President Nicole Pittman spoke about the harm of placing youth on the sex offender registry and the efforts being made to reform these laws.

    Impact Justice Releases Report and Infographic on School-to-Prison Pipeline

    Dr. Angela Irvine released a policy brief that documents that 9 in 10 detained and incarcerated youth were suspended or expelled before entering the justice system. Dr. Irvine also released an infographic showing that Black boys who have been suspended are 180 times more likely to enter the California juvenile justice system than one White girl who has never been suspended.

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  • Stay up-to-date on the future of criminal justice reform, with leading-edge research on everything from restorative justice and community-alternatives to incarceration to the devastating consequences of youth sex-offense registration.