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Danielle Soto has more than a decade of experience in research and analysis of adolescent well-being and risk, with a focus on gendered and racial/ethnic inequalities. She graduated Cum Laude with her B.A. in Sociology (Juvenile Delinquency emphasis) from the University of Montana, where she was a McNair Scholar. She received her master’s degree and Ph.D. from Bowling Green State University in Sociology/Criminology. There she specialized in juvenile delinquency and minored in Family Studies and Quantitative Methods. Her master’s thesis looked at sexual minority youth and delinquent offending, paying special attention to the impact of sexual identity. Her dissertation examined Latino delinquency, looking at the differences in country-of-origin and generational status.

After graduate school, Danielle spent four years as an Assistant Professor, where she served as an advisor/mentor for many campus and community groups serving underrepresented students. Wanting to use her professional skills in research and analysis in an applied way, she made the transition to the non-profit arena. Recognizing that true justice requires attention paid to the intersections of race/ethnicity, sexuality and sexual identity, sex and gender expression, gender identity, and socioeconomic status, she frequently examines disparities in these areas.